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Thursday 21 April 2016.
Found objects from a profusion of cultural backgrounds were displayed equivalently and without further comment.
Then different places and incidents collapsed together.
Then bubbles and droplets recalled microcosms in seventeenth-century nature-morte painting.
Then many lives of art highlighted its ability to simultaneously uphold and destroy illusions.
Then discrete marks held their own space, emphasizing their self-contained energy.
Then viewers began to assemble a complex web of formal relations.
Then trompe l’oeil techniques in oil paint mimicked heavy sculptural stones.
Then lush and eloquent images were perfectly constructed impossibilities.
Then using a homemade bath, 8mm, 16mm and 35mm black and white film emulsion was chemically destabilized to extract the filmic image and optical sound track from the reels of celluloid.
Then interrelated bodies of work fused history, anecdote, and artefact.
Then highly distinctive techniques moved between multi-layered pictorial spaces.
Then words, phrases and doodles, were traced with a finger.
Then a mysterious palimpsest of time and space contained visual echoes of disparate details.
Then the condensation on a windowpane became the means through which the eye glimpsed the scene within.
Then graffiti took on an almost spectral presence.
Then multimedia practice investigated the slippage between technological platforms and ways they are consumed and decoded in the social realm.
Then abstract/semi-abstract, monochromatic forms, simultaneously re-engaged early 20th Century black and white cinema and the tradition of the Modernist monochrome.
Then the once duplicitous became whole.
Then boundaries were blurred by exchanges and transformations like the accuracy of radiocarbon dating continually being altered due to excess carbon entering the atmosphere from the burning of fossil fuels.
Then Friday 22 April 2016.
Then the image became less coalescent.
Then rollers and brooms were used to spread a soft palette of red, blue, green, and purple acrylic paints over unprimed canvases laid directly on the studio ground.
Then not only a potent subject matter but also a conceptual equivalent allowed to work.
Then incidental debris and textures beneath the canvas emerged as impressions during the frottage process.
Then through sculptural installations ephemeral notions of time, silence, memory, absence and dreams, resonated with imaginative tension.
Then an assemblage of plaster heads was installed like a mass of remains on the floor.
Then between homage, transgression and estrangement, the echo of the ancient world was charged with mystery.
Then new sculptures were made from hulking industrial parts.
Then distance between subject and object, the represented and the representative was collapsed.
Then rubber mallets, dildos, bowling pins and billiard balls reminded that these works exist in the physical, as well as metaphysical, world.
Then culture took imaginative leaps forward, postulating a world of stark angles and sawtooth synthesizers.
Then retro-futuristic archeological remnants referenced human culture and the natural history of planet Earth.
Then stacked columns of polyhedra formed in MDF populated the space.
Then aesthetic impressions were created by measures of force.
Then a series of natural stones were painted to look like M&M candies.
Then the gradual process was extended with visceral abstraction.
Then actual bubblegum corresponded in some ways to the questions of painting and historical representation.
Then image, time, sound and narrative fixed onto a canvas-as-screen became a kind of “terminal projection” of a “petrified cinema.”
Then the visual games and enigmas that pervade Rococo and Mannerist painting were firmly rooted, formally and conceptually, within critical observations of our time.
Then Saturday 23 April 2016.

(…)

‘Thursday then Friday then Saturday then Sunday then Monday then Tuesday then Wednesday,’ 2017,
New York: AC Books. In ‘7 Days: My Art Life,’ edited by Holly Crawford, pages 38-49.


Related work:

Claude Closky, ‘Entretien sur l’art,’ 2022, (February 10) performance, Fondation Pernod Ricard, invited by Jill Gasparina, 35 minutes.‘Entretien sur l’art,’ 2022, (February 10) performance, Fondation Pernod Ricard, invited by Jill Gasparina, 35 minutes.

Claude Closky, ‘Exhibition Neo-Geo by Camila Oliveira Fairclough at 7 Clous, Marseille,’ 2021, press release, 7 Clous, Marseille.‘Exhibition Neo-Geo by Camila Oliveira Fairclough at 7 Clous, Marseille,’ 2021, press release, 7 Clous, Marseille.

Claude Closky, ‘The Armory Show 2006 Catalogue,’ 2006, in ‘Outsourced Critics,’ New York: AC Institute, edited by Holly Crawford (http://web.archive.org/web/20070202125557/http://www.artcircles.org/id90.html), p. 23-32.‘The Armory Show 2006 Catalogue,’ 2006, in ‘Outsourced Critics,’ New York: AC Institute, edited by Holly Crawford (http://web.archive.org/web/20070202125557/http://www.artcircles.org/id90.html), p. 23-32.