Lire la version originale en français

UNTITLED
The paintings of Claude Closky

Marie Muracciole
Editions M19, Paris, 2007. Translated from French by Gail de Courcy-Ireland

wheel of fortune

There are ten paintings, two in black and white. They are disks, with a diameter slightly larger than human scale: 2.10 m. Each surface is divided from the centre outwards into unequal, different-coloured “parts”. Each expanse of colour is applied flat with an opaque coat of acrylic paint. The principle of the series points to premeditation. The anonymity of the gesture that did the dividing and painting indicates cold determination. The apparent arbitrariness of the dimensions of the “parts” suggests contraction and expansion, the folding and opening of a 360° fan. Limited to questions of surface, the rivalry between the coloured expanses does not install spatial hierarchy nor prompt any optical hollowing. The circular format, which has been called a tondo since the Italian Renaissance, does away with the tradition of painting as a window where the representation of near and far is displayed. The painting imposes itself through the covering of its physical expanse, not through its subordination to a frame.

Exhibition view 'Roue de la fortune', Galerie Edward Mitterrand, Genève. 19 May - 30 June 200

Exhibition view ‘Roue de la fortune’, Galerie Edward Mitterrand, Geneva. 19 May – 30 June 2005.

Claude Closky, Sans titre (002757), 2005

Claude Closky, ‘Untitled (002757)’, 2005,
acrylic on canvas, ø 210 cm

Claude Closky, sans titre (FBAE00), 2005

Claude Closky, ‘Untitled (FBAE00)’, 2005,
acrylic on canvas, ø 210 cm

As has often been the case in the last half century, these “abstract” paintings model themselves on an existing two-dimensional element. The composition and colours of each tondo here refer to the diagrams known as “pie charts” that are commonly used in the press, disks whose slices display the share of a sum or a quantity. In the graphical language of the media, curves are used to describe the evolution of a quota over time, disks are the image of a fixed moment.

We are familiar with these charts destined to feed us with information at the speed of images, faster than text. They are a visual, implicit text that solicits the viewer’s automatisms of memory more than the reader’s faculties of articulation. But in the move from page to painting, the effect of potted essence and instant capture is disturbed by the spectacular dimension of the surfaces, the arbitrary interactions between the colours; in short, by the materiality and temporality that are specific to painting. You need time to consider the expanse of it, space to integrate the dimension of the format and envisage the whole, then more time to take in what brings the different pieces together and what sets them apart. Lastly, the shift of scale modifies the viewer’s physical posture—instead of peering at the page, you have to move about in the space, a radical inversion of the relationship between the model and its medium of reproduction. The pie charts have abandoned the rectangle of the page for a “format” that fits their contour. Here the traditional tondo is a shaped canvas.

At their first showing in 2005 at the Edward Mitterrand Gallery in Geneva, the paintings were accompanied by “drawings” that also followed a serial principle. Taking Swiss lottery forms, Claude Closky had filled in six numbers in each of the ten grids, as per the regulations. Yet the layout of the crosses that singularised the grids and composed the form followed geometric motifs quite alien to the characteristic subjectivity that goes with games of chance. These lottery grids were thus flirting with the compositional grid of Modernist abstraction, associating pie in the sky with rational geometry. But the crosses were sufficiently approximate to have been drawn by the artist’s hand, as though multiplying false declarations of illiteracy on real forms, as we are frequently requested to do by various administrative services. Wheel of Fortune was the title of the exhibition, not of the paintings, which all bore the subtitle Untitled.

Claude Closky, Bulletin Swiss Lotto 208238, 2005

Claude Closky, ‘Swiss Lotto Bulletin 208238’, 2005,
ballpoint pen on printed matter, 11 x 16 cm

surface reaction

yksolC edualC

Representation isn’t a fatality! What I try to do with a pictogram is to flip it over and sever the exclusive relationship which links it to its subject, replacing this relationship with a new one, just as exclusive, with itself. Like I’ve done with these sentences!secnetnes eseht htiw enod ev’I ekiL .flesti htiw ,evisulcxe sa tsuj ,eno wen a htiw pihsnoitaler siht gnicalper ,tcejbus sti ot ti sknil hcihw pihsnoitaler evisulcxe eht reves dna revo ti pilf ot si margotcip a htiw od ot yrt I tahW !ytilataf a t’nsi noitatneserpeR

Claude Closky [1]

The artist has realised two sets of paintings, in 2003 and 2005. He delegated their execution, an age-old story that can be said to start in the studios of the Renaissance and culminate with minimalist and conceptual programmatics. As we saw here earlier, the images do not instantly state their name. The paint does, however, spread out in elementary flatness. Let us pause to remember that, after working exclusively on painting for a short period within a group,[2] Closky embarked in 1989 on the approach we know today: making drawings and books that instance special relationships with words and things. The drawings move effortlessly from elementary literalness when he represents signs (le 2 de 25 [The 2 of 25], 1991, or Un numéro de telephone et une plaque d’immatriculation qui se ressemblent [A telephone number and a licence plate that look alike], 1991) to lapidary and madcap mimesis (Un oeuf très rond [A very round egg], 1994). In his books he sorts words according to formal principles (De A à Z [From A to Z], 1992) or collects platitudes in the form of stories (Osez [Dare], 1994, Prédictions [Predictions], 1996, Mon Catalogue [My Catalogue], 1999). To be precise, he is interested in the surface of things and in surface things, including language. We could put it that this work—which is not based on a technique, a format, or a medium, but on a general economy of flattening out, thus a surface culture—offers a metonymic prolongation to his primary activity as a painter. We would thus like to have fully explored the question.

Closky’s work undermines the degree of blind belief we have in certain words, images, and modes that give meaning, by subverting it into a surface reaction. He plays with the production techniques tied to the contents of a connected, Western environment against the mediums that display them, the formats that regulate them, the market and communications mechanisms that feed off their circulation. He takes over domains where the density of the message is inversely proportional to the hyper-visibility of its enunciation, and his approach only solicits the various contents at play through certain workings of their representation in their customary places of use—where, paradoxically, nobody bothers to look at them.

Claude Closky, Le 2 de 25, 1991

Claude Closky, ‘Le 2 de 25 [The 2 from 25]’, 1991,
ballpoint pen on paper, 30 x 24 cm

Claude Closky, Un numéro de téléphone et une plaque d'imatriculation qui se ressemblent, 1991

Claude Closky, ‘Un numéro de téléphone et une plaque d’imatriculation qui se ressemblent [A telephone number and a license plate that look alike]’, 1991,
ballpoint pen on paper, 30 x24 cm

Claude Closky, Un oeuf très rond, 1994

Claude Closky, ‘Un oeuf très rond [A very round egg]’, 1994,
ballpoint pen on paper, 30 x 24 cm

Claude Closky, De A à Z [From A to Z], 1992

Claude Closky, ‘De A à Z [From A to Z]’, 1992,
Paris: Galerie Jennifer Flay.

Claude Closky, Prédictions [Predictions], 1996

Claude Closky, ‘Prédictions [Predictions]’, 1996,
Rouen: Frac Haute-Normandie, 80 pages, 21 x 15 cm.

Everyday language provides him with a material and a model. Ditto for certain standard manufactured images, the utilitarian clichés overloading our environment that claim to be objective and transparent representations. The animations collected on the Internet to spin round in Manège [Roundabout] (2006) are a recent example of this. As they race randomly one after the other across the standard screens that they successively bring to life on the walls of a spartan exhibition space, they skate over a double absence. On the one hand the randomness in their succession both articulates and avoids them, choosing just one, leaving thousands out of shot. On the other hand, these images that are so omnipresent in our environment are made to pass quickly without holding the gaze; they are bound for permanent deletion. By using them in Manège, Closky inverses the phenomenon. He emphasises their function as narrative sequences, destined to bring a piece of information to the surface as crudely as possible, and dispels the scant details that could introduce subsidiary significations. While the images in Manège move and are read left to right, like clocks and Western script, the length of each narrative and the degree to which it is diluted override the action described. In this new display mode, they produce the surprise effect that no-one expected.

Closky charts the exchanges and movements, the particular economy of certain representations through which the question of equivalences and values pass. The formal transpositions that he operates inflect the coefficient of meaning with great efficiency. The video Les Aoûtiens [August vacation] (1997) is a sequence of holiday advertising images in a landscape of Mediterranean connotation. The texts have been removed, altering the density of the information and heightening the effect of a conjugation of constants and variables. The constants are three colours—blue, white, and tan—and the human figures are uniformly young and muscular. The few variables are sex and clothing, but they are of low magnitude. This levelling of form authorises permutations of the surface without variations in content, a well-oiled sequence to which Closky adds a parenthesis: instead of fading out, he prefers the grid motif. The geometrisation of the pixels vaporises the Cyclades into bathroom tiling, the message slides from maritime peplum to middle-class domesticity. We know that this type of image, which is based on its function and not on the object it evokes, targets our consumer compulsions less than our gaze, but this is a pretty fun way of reminding us. In Greek etymology, economy is the management of goods and the exchanges around them. Closky adds a little extra to the economy of transfer, and the salaried workers targeted by scenes of a sterilised Olympus turn into bathroom users: condensation (steam) and displacement (leaving on holiday) are present. In this vein of ideas, it is perhaps not insignificant that the two series of paintings and some of Closky’s videos take their models from the “economy” pages in the press, as did the Nasdaq wallpaper. In the first series, the “curves” were based on the principle of two flat colours separated by a line rising from left right. No title, X or Y-axis was present to index this diagonal to any data. Now, two years later, Closky is reiterating his gesture, slightly shifting his subject and moving from a sequence (the path of the curve) to a fixed capture (the parts of a share) on a format that merges more obviously with the form of its model.

Claude Closky, Manège [Roundabout], 2006

Claude Closky, ‘Manège [Roundabout]’, 2006,
video installation, sixteen 32" flat screens, 16×2 stereo speakers, comptuter, dimensions variable, unlimited duration

Claude Closky, Les aoûtiens, 1997-1998

Claude Closky, ‘August vacation’, 1997-1998,
video projector, computer, silent, loop. Coproduction Centre pour l’image contemporaine Saint-Gervais, Genève

former lives

Closky conceives his paintings and many of his drawings, videos, and printed matter using a familiar visual vocabulary for which we have already formed an opinion. The reputation of certain images, letters, and words precedes them. We expect an economic diagram to provide a vision of factual exactitude at a glance, featuring connections more than quantities and information as rapidly out of date as it is extensive. On top of these immediate elements of recognition comes the explicit commentary of the captions. In the paintings, Closky suspends these two modes of reading, cancelling all implicit or explicit commentary: in return for this silence, he offers the image a major enlargement on the canvas. The moves being made—from the page to the picture surface, the world of media to the world of abstract painting, from information to silence—noticeably alters the velocity of our gaze. What I try to do …is to …sever the exclusive relationship which links [the representation] to its subject. Here we have the detached form that does not have to account to anyone, especially since the present technical obsolescence of painting as representation seems to exclude it from the dominant circuits that produce meaning, exempting it from any major discourse in art.

In reality, this supposed obsolescence, this destitution in relation to the diversity of art forms actually contributes to the mirage that makes painting a far-off, desirable island. It is preceded by its reputation. The one that Modernism gave it, for example, dispelling figure and narration, assimilating form to content, and measuring progress in art as being proportional to the specification of the medium. In terms of form and process, Closky’s paintings do indeed hark back to the history of flat painting and the border between abstraction-representation (from Matisse to Hard-edge and Neo-geo via Pop, all the way to Olivier Mosset or Sarah Morris, etc.) and to the history of artistic supports (from Delaunay’s records to Noland’s targets, not forgetting Mosset’s tondos and other circular shaped canvases). This is all perfectly natural, and the way in which the present re-reads the past does not cancel out the succession of facts. The singularity of a painting in a world where everyday objects have long since been annexed by art, and images annexed by everyday life, is one thing. The absolute silence of a painting that would make you forget all models, be they objects, daily life, or even art and history, is another, much harder thing to obtain: unless some prodigious throw of the dice were to free us from remembered models. But even chance is indexed to the history it rolls the dice for, and condemned to form a model itself: Representation (is) a fatality! There’s no getting away from it. The strict autonomy of the work is accompanied by the canned laughter of the spectacle of its autonomisation, it does not really open onto the discourse-free materiality that formalism once expected. Art & Language’s 100% Abstract series stigmatised the fact that any attempt in this direction could only end up with a tautology, as in the 1968 painting that displays the percentage of materials used to inscribe it (Titanium calcium 83% Silicates 17%). The recipe is the figure. Painting based on form does not emancipate form, it represents it.

Art & Language, 100 % Abstract, 1968

Art & Language, ‘100 % Abstract’, 1968

silent pictures

Plus beau [More beautiful] (2003-2005) is an interactive video installation where each click of a computer mouse made available to the public reconfigures a chequered layout on a screen. The colours change, the scale of the grid varies; the arrangement is basic and the possibilities apparently endless. The title indicates progression with satisfaction. Indeed, with each composition replacing this relationship with a new one and preparing us for the next, the reputation of each image is made by the previous ones that fuelled our expectation. If the image grows more beautiful, however, it is down to two—contradictory—reasons: because we have seen the previous ones and because it makes us forget them. Plus beau counts on the permanent hesitation between the recording of what is to come and the trace of what has been, the instability of the known and the new (which is not always the unknown); it stigmatises a constant, lightweight reincarnation of desire. A composition in progress, it is based on the enigmatic nature of our availability at the moment in hand.

Claude Closky, More Beautiful, 2002-2004

Claude Closky, More Beautiful, 2002-2004

Claude Closky, ‘Plus beau [More Beautiful]’, 2002-2004,
interactive video installation, 2 computers, 2 mouses, 2 tables, 2 video projectors, dimensions variable

The title of the first exhibition of tondos, Wheel of Fortune, evoked a trivial form of a dice throw, the permanent long-awaited surprise of the real in art, but the content was transmitted via the “slow-motion” of painting, accentuated by an unspectacular stroke and pre-planned compositions. The formula also suggested an unexpected coincidence between the geometric neutrality of the pictorial surface and the vagaries of chance. Let us recall that Wheel of Fortune, which evokes the arbitrariness of variations in the economy and finances, is the name of a popular game and cult television show from the 1970s. Let’s be clear about this: Closky did not make any of this by chance, neither the paintings nor the blue-pencilling on the lottery tickets turned paradigms of the Modernist abstract grid. He had programmed the intervention of the works in the Geneva exhibition very carefully, reminding us that the wheel turns: 360°, 100%. For though chance has no form, it is not chaos. In the games that take its name it is set out by strict rules. In art, we talk of the “laws of chance” that supplied automatons to artists seeking to free themselves from their own automatisms, like the Taeuber-Arp spouses in 1917, and later John Cage, François Morellet or Ellsworth Kelly. It is Cage who, upon meeting Kelly in Paris when the latter was visiting France, advised him to look at the collages decided by chance at Arp’s place in Meudon. The young American was looking to get away from the figures that kept cropping up in his abstract compositions. Bogged down by his fascination for Picasso and Matisse, Kelly tried multiple strategies to produce an “impersonal” art and deliver forms that did not state their names. Chance, in the form of arbitrariness, became one of the strategies, like the shaped canvas he developed at the same time as Frank Stella in New York. Matched with the all-over, the shaped canvas had the advantage of removing the traditional component of representation—a background showing a figure on the surface. And to get away from the omnipresence of the figure, François Morellet, whom Kelly met at the same time, flirted prematurely with conceptual art and used pre-established systems to govern his compositions—well before the 1961 series, Répartition aléatoire de 40 000 carrés [Random distribution of 40,000 squares], the titles in which specify the percentage shared between the two colours chosen following a random succession of odd and even numbers in the telephone directory. Chance is an excellent tool for working on codes, repetition, hierarchy, or the law, for throwing habits and interpretations off course. Its big plus is that it conveys no discourse, it is an operator of detachment, a “free hand” function. The rules, constraints, codes, and hierarchies that fill our existence are among Closky’s raw materials; he likes to dilute their intensity. Here, the scattering of decision factors adds levers to a vast chain of production—videos, books, digital prints, and drawings—where the artist upsets the order of connections and indeed substitutes the exclusive relationship that links a sign to a treated subject with another, equally exclusive relationship with itself.

The fact that appearance comes first does not mean the work is only limited to appearance. Closky knows that his way has a meaning, that the technique he chooses supplies a discourse (which the forms echo off each other more surely than their content). His work shows no manual virtuosity that would amount to a display of assurance, in the dual sense of the term: no erasing of the manufacturing procedures that would give the final object a manifest character or authority, no clumsy execution that would highlight the author and his signature. On the other hand, his twisting of existing elements possesses a power of designation over their original sphere, which was not art, and therefore by extension over the absence from whence they came to become art. The delay and the silence of shifted figures invoke the border between art and non-art, but also the gap between the presence of things and their representation, their name, and the anonymity of the form. For all that, this relative silence does not remove the mimesis of the paintings, where we always end up seeing something—for even if the formats and the signs around us hinge more on themselves than their content, representation is a fatality.

François Morellet, Répartition aléatoire de 40 000 carrés, 50 % noir, 50 % blanc, 1961

François Morellet, ‘Répartition aléatoire de 40 000 carrés, 50 % noir, 50 % blanc’, 1961

Closky returns to painting by articulating it like words; he turns it into a vocabulary of surface and plays with a few false platitudes on flatness with a good helping of humour. In the past century, pictoriality has become a significant boundary in art, both theoretically and economically. Declared dead and gone, it keeps on coming back to life, and though today it is one more art form among others, its longevity makes it a major index and indication of art speculation. Closky works with it in the same way he will “clean up” the photographs, videos, texts, or lists of words that he appropriates in order to turn them into the elements of another language. After all, perhaps the financial domain that is the source of the two series also enables them to be seen as “figures” in the accountancy sense of the word, where a necessarily superficial and elementary examination of a few uses of painting would feature. Except that no X or Y-axes are provided for questions of spatial scope, production modes, and the possibility of action. Contrary to the 100% Abstract, out go the caption, the commentary, even the numbers. And unlike in Morellet’s 40,000 squares, there is no system that reveals the inner workings. Yet the tondos cannot avoid the fields of knowledge and history that they arbitrarily display. The painted surface adds an appearance of material and historical stability to the artist’s typical destabilisation of significations.

babelisation of signs

Closky’s prolific practice tends to consider the circulation of signs as an obsessive form of reality. He moves between Pop, conceptual art and the visual side of experiences with words, passing from Hains to Filliou, from a bit of Fluxus to a smattering of Oulipo and certainly Morellet, whom he visited when he started his first drawings and books. By caring less about the content or discourse of everyday signs than about their use, Closky prolongs a line passed down via Duchamp and above all Broodthaers. Like them, he works with everything that makes us believe—or not—in what words and images represent, that makes us see—or not—the form they take or give in relation to what they state or describe, etc. Asserting meaning or a knowledge of some truth is not his problem. He babelises languages, recharges forms with their capacity for ambivalence, and puts them back in circulation: tondos are in reality shaped canvases in the form of a tondo, a monocular aim, a target, etc. Signs and forms can be variable, language and art offer them multiple entryways. Their transparency is but an illusion. The wheel turns.

Reading or looking do not always give us access to messages, but take us to new capacities of articulating the visible, minute shifts away from and towards significations. Art reconfigures and releases systems and languages, replaces them in the problematic status of the living. And the movement of languages and signs displaces those who speak and read them.

By altering systems, Closky delays the fatality of representation and focuses on the subject matter in hand: an articulation between the authority of painting, its format, the speculations that keep it thriving, the diagrams capable of taking over this territory, the economy that distracts it from talking only about itself. Place your bets: in the splitting of shares between techniques, referents, and the different regimes they belong to, transits the status of signs and the things they become. But not solely. In the end, something in the painting concerns us. “As for the inner book of unknown signs […] which nobody could help me read by any kind of rule, this reading consisted in an act of creation in which no-one could take our place or even collaborate with us.”[3]

[1] This text was published for the exhibition “Pictograms – The Loneliness of Signs”, Kunstmuseum Stuttgart, 260, p. 230.

[2] The Ripoulins.

[3] Marcel Proust, “Time regained” In Search of Lost Time, Volume 7. My translation.

Read the English translation

SANS TITRE
Les peintures de Claude Closky

Marie Muracciole
Editions M19, Paris, 2007.

roues de la fortune

Il y a dix tableaux, dont deux en noir et blanc. Ce sont des disques d’un diamètre légèrement supérieur à l’échelle humaine, 2,10 m. Chaque surface se divise à partir du centre en « parts » inégales de couleurs différentes. Chaque étendue de couleur est posée en aplat, à l’acrylique, en couche opaque. Le principe de la série indique la préméditation. L’anonymat du geste qui a procédé à la division et au recouvrement signale une froide détermination. L’arbitraire apparent de la dimension des « parts » suggère la contraction et la dilatation, le repli et l’ouverture d’un éventail à 360°. Tenue à des questions de surface, la rivalité des étendues de couleur n’instaure pas de hiérarchie spatiale et n’encourage aucun effet de creusement optique. Le format circulaire, qu’on nomme depuis la Renaissance italienne un tondo, évacue la tradition du tableau comme une fenêtre où s’organise la représentation du proche et du lointain. Le tableau s’impose par le recouvrement de son étendue physique, non dans sa subordination à un cadre.

Exhibition view 'Roue de la fortune', Galerie Edward Mitterrand, Genève. 19 May - 30 June 200

Exhibition view ‘Roue de la fortune’, Galerie Edward Mitterrand, Genève. 19 May – 30 June 2005.

Claude Closky, Sans titre (002757), 2005

Claude Closky, ‘Sans titre (002757)’, 2005,
acrylique sur toile, ø 210 cm

Claude Closky, sans titre (FBAE00), 2005

Claude Closky, ‘Sans titre (FBAE00)’, 2005,
acrylique sur toile, ø 210 cm

Comme souvent depuis un demi-siècle, ces tableaux «abstraits» prennent modèle sur quelque chose qui existe déjà, quelque chose qui est bidimensionnel. La composition et les couleurs de chaque tondo se réfèrent en effet à l’un de ces diagrammes appelés «camemberts» et couramment utilisés dans la presse, ces disques dont les parts affichent la répartition d’une somme ou une quantité. Dans le langage graphique des médias, on utilise des courbes pour décrire l’évolution d’une quotité dans le temps, les disques pour donner l’état d’une répartition. Les courbes sont indexées au déroulement, les disques sont l’image d’un moment arrêté.

Nous sommes familiers de ces schémas destinés à nous faire parvenir une information à la vitesse des images, plus vite qu’un texte. Ils sont un texte visuel, implicite, les automatismes de la mémoire étant plus sollicités que les facultés d’articulation du lecteur. Mais dans le déplacement de la page au tableau, l’effet d’une réduction à l’essentiel et d’une saisie instantanée est perturbé par la dimension spectaculaire des surfaces et par les interactions arbitraires entre les couleurs, bref, par la matérialité et la temporalité spécifiques de la peinture. Il faut du temps pour en considérer l’étendue, du recul pour intégrer la dimension du format et envisager l’ensemble, puis un délai pour intégrer ce qui distingue et rapproche les différents tableaux. Enfin, le déplacement d’échelle modifie la posture physique de celui qui regarde – au lieu de scruter la page, on doit se déplacer dans l’espace. Ce qui inverse radicalement la relation entre le modèle et le support de sa reproduction. Les camemberts ont quitté le rectangle de la page pour un « format » qui épouse leur contour. Le tondo traditionnel est en l’occurrence un shaped canvas.

Lors de leur première exposition, chez Edward Mitterrand à Genève en 2005, les tableaux étaient accompagnés de « dessins » réalisés eux aussi sur un principe sériel. Sur des bulletins du loto suisse, Claude Closky avait coché six numéros de chacune des dix grilles, dans le respect du règlement. La disposition des croix qui singularisent les dix grilles composant chaque bulletin obéissait cependant à des motifs géométriques très étrangers à la subjectivité qui caractérise la participation aux jeux de hasard. Ces grilles de loto flirtaient ainsi avec la grille compositionnelle de l’abstraction moderniste, associant les plans sur la comète et la rationalité de la géométrie. Mais les croix étaient suffisamment approximatives pour être de la main de l’artiste, qui multipliait de cette manière de fausses déclarations d’illettrisme sur de vrais formulaires, comme nous sommes tous invités à le faire régulièrement par différentes administrations. Le titre, Roues de la Fortune, était celui de l’exposition, et non des tableaux, légendés chaque fois Sans titre.

Claude Closky, Bulletin Swiss Lotto 208238, 2005

Claude Closky, ‘Swiss Lotto Bulletin 208238’, 2005,
stylo bille sur imprimé, 11 x 16 cm

surface de réparation

yksolC edualC

Representation isn’t a fatality ! What I try to do with a pictogram is to flip it over and sever the exclusive relationship which links it to its subject, replacing this relationship by a new one, just as exclusive with itself. Like I’ve done with these sentences ! secnetnes eseht htiw enod ev’I ekiL. flesti htiw evisulcxe sa tsuj, eno wen a yb pihsnoitaler siht gnicalper, tcejbus sti ot ti sknil hcihw pihsnoitaler evisulcxe eht reves dna revo ti pilf ot si margotcip a htiw od ot yrt I tahW ! ytilataf a t’nsi noitatneserpeR

Claude Closky [1]

L’artiste a réalisé deux séries de tableaux, en 2003 et en 2005. Il en a délégué l’exécution, c’est une vieille histoire qui peut commencer dans les ateliers de la Renaissance et culmine avec les programmatiques minimalistes et conceptuelles. Et, comme vu précédemment, les images n’y disent pas immédiatement leur nom. La peinture oui, qui s’étale dans une planéité élémentaire. Rappelons qu’après s’être un temps assez court exclusivement employé à cette pratique à l’intérieur d’un groupe [2], Closky a engagé en 1989 la démarche que nous connaissons aujourd’hui, en réalisant des dessins et des livres qui font état de relations particulières avec les mots et les choses. Les dessins passent avec aisance d’une littéralité élémentaire, lorsqu’il représente des signes (Le 2 de 25, 1991 ou Un numéro de téléphone et une plaque d’immatriculation qui se ressemblent, 1991) à une mimésis lapidaire et loufoque (Un oeuf très rond, 1994). Dans ses livres, il range des mots selon des principes formels (De A à Z, 1992) ou collectionne des platitudes en forme d’histoire (Osez, 1994, Prédictions, 1996, Mon Catalogue, 1999). Très exactement, il s’intéresse à la surface des choses et aux choses de la surface, dont le langage. On pourrait avancer que ce travail – qui ne repose ni sur une technique, ni sur un format ou un support, mais sur une économie générale de la mise à plat et donc une culture de la surface – offre un prolongement métonymique à sa première activité de peintre. On aimerait avoir ainsi fait le tour de la question.

L’oeuvre de Closky sape une surface de réparation [3] à la part de croyance aveugle que nous accordons à certains mots et images, aux modalités qui instaurent le sens. Il joue avec les techniques de production attachées aux contenus d’un environnement occidental et connecté, avec les supports qui les affichent, les formats qui les réglementent, les mécanismes de la communication et du marché qui s’alimentent de leur circulation. Il s’empare de domaines où la densité du message est inversement proportionnelle à l’hypervisibilité de son énonciation, et sa démarche ne sollicite les contenus en jeu qu’au travers des mécaniques de leur représentation, là où leur usage les inscrit, et où paradoxalement nul ne prend la peine de les regarder.

Claude Closky, Le 2 de 25, 1991

Claude Closky, ‘Le 2 de 25’, 1991,
stylo bille sur papier, 30 x 24 cm

Claude Closky, Un numéro de téléphone et une plaque d'imatriculation qui se ressemblent, 1991

Claude Closky, ‘Un numéro de téléphone et une plaque d’imatriculation qui se ressemblent’, 1991, stylo bille sur papier, 30 x24 cm

Claude Closky, Un oeuf très rond, 1994

Claude Closky, ‘Un oeuf très rond’, 1994,
stylo bille sur papier, 30 x 24 cm

Claude Closky, De A à Z [From A to Z], 1992

Claude Closky, ‘De A à Z’, 1992,
Editions Galerie Jennifer Flay, Paris.

Claude Closky, Prédictions [Predictions], 1996

Claude Closky, ‘Prédictions’, 1996,
Editions Frac Haute-Normandie, Rouen, 80 pages, 21 x 15 cm.

Le langage usuel lui fournit à la fois un matériau et un modèle. Idem pour certaines images de fabrication courante, les clichés utilitaires dont notre environnement déborde et qui se donnent pour des représentations objectives et transparentes. Les animations collectées sur le net pour tourner dans Manège (2006) en sont un exemple récent. Leur course, l’une après l’autre dans un ordre choisi par le hasard, sur les écrans standard qu’elles animent l’un après l’autre aux murs d’un espace d’exposition spartiate, glisse sur une double absence. D’une part l’aléatoire de leur succession les articule et les escamote à la fois, n’en choisissant qu’une, en laissant des milliers hors champ. D’autre part ces images omniprésentes dans notre environnement sont faites pour passer vite et sans retenir le regard, elles sont en voie d’effacement permanent. Les reprenant dans Manège, Closky inverse le phénomène. Il accentue leur fonction de séquences narratives destinées à faire émerger une information à la surface le plus crûment possible, et évacue les rares détails pouvant introduire des significations annexes. Tandis que les images de Manège tournent dans le sens de la lecture des mots et de l’heure, la durée de chaque récit et son degré de dilution prennent le pas sur l’action décrite. À leur nouvelle manière de passer, elles produisent l’effet d’étonnement que nul n’en attendait.

Closky cartographie les échanges et les déplacements, l’économie particulière de certaines représentations où transite la question des équivalences et des valeurs. Les transpositions d’ordre formel qu’il opère y infléchissent efficacement le coefficient du sens. La vidéo Les Aoûtiens (1997) enchaîne des images publicitaires pour vacances dans un paysage à connotation méditerranéenne. La suppression des textes modifie la densité de l’information, accentue l’effet d’une conjugaison de constantes et de variables. Les constantes sont trois couleurs, bleu, blanc et bronzé, les figures humaines sont uniformément jeunes et musclées. Les quelques variables, de faible amplitude, sont sexuelles et vestimentaires. Ce nivellement formel autorise des permutations de la surface sans variations du contenu, un enchaînement parfaitement huilé auquel Closky apporte une incidente au moment du fondu enchaîné : il a choisi le motif de la grille. La géométrisation des pixels vaporise les Cyclades en carrelage de salle de bains, le message coule du péplum marin à l’univers domestique petit-bourgeois. On sait que ce type d’image, qui repose sur sa fonction et non sur l’objet qu’elle évoque, vise moins notre regard que notre compulsion de consommateur, mais la manière de le rappeler est assez drôle. L’économie, dans l’étymologie grecque, c’est la gestion des biens, et celle des échanges les concernant. Closky en ajoute un peu à l’économie du transfert et les salariés visés par les scènes d’une Olympe aseptisée se muent en usagers de salle de bains : condensation (buée) et déplacement (départs en vacances) sont au rendez-vous. Dans cet ordre d’idées, il n’est peut-être pas anodin que les deux séries de peintures, comme le papier peint Nasdaq, ou certaines vidéos, trouvent leur modèle dans les pages « économie » de la presse. La première série, les « courbes », reposait sur le principe de deux aplats de couleur séparés par un trait ascendant de gauche à droite. Aucun titre, aucune abscisse ni ordonnée n’indexe cette diagonale à une information précise. Deux ans plus tard Closky réitère son geste, en décalant légèrement son sujet et en passant d’une séquence (le trajet de la courbe) à une saisie figée (l’état d’une répartition) sur un format qui fusionne plus évidemment avec la forme du modèle.

Claude Closky, Manège [Roundabout], 2006

Claude Closky, ‘Manège’, 2006,
installation vidéo, seize 32" écran plat, 16×2 enceintes stéréos, ordinateur, dimensions variables, durée illimité

Claude Closky, Les aoûtiens, 1997-1998

Claude Closky, ‘August vacation’, 1997-1998,
projecteur video, ordinateur, muet, boucle. Coproduction Centre pour l’image contemporaine Saint-Gervais, Genève

vies antérieures

Closky conçoit ses peintures et beaucoup de ses dessins, impressions et vidéos au moyen d’un vocabulaire visuel familier sur lequel notre opinion est faite. La réputation de certaines images les précède, au même titre que des lettres ou des mots. On attend d’un schéma économique une vision d’une exactitude factuelle, en un seul coup d’oeil, dans laquelle les rapports apparaissent plus que les quantités en jeu, avec des informations aussi massives que tôt périmées. À ces éléments de reconnaissance immédiate s’ajoute le commentaire explicite des légendes. Sur les tableaux, Closky suspend ces deux modes de lecture, annulant tout commentaire, implicite ou explicite, pour offrir à l’image, en contrepartie de ce silence, un agrandissement considérable sur la toile. La succession de déplacements, de la page à la surface picturale, de l’univers des médias à celui de la peinture abstraite et de l’information au silence, altère sensiblement la vitesse du regard. What I try to do (…) is to (…) sever the exclusive relationship which links (the representation) to its subject [Ce que j’essaye de faire, c’est de rompre la relation exclusive qui lie la représentation à son sujet]. Voilà la forme détachée, qui n’aurait plus de comptes à rendre à rien ni personne, puisque par ailleurs l’obsolescence technique de la peinture en matière de représentation semble l’exclure des circuits dominants de la production du sens, et désormais la dispenser de tout discours majeur dans l’art. Cette supposée obsolescence, ce dénuement de la peinture face à la diversité des formes de l’art, contribuent au mirage qui fait d’elle une île lointaine et désirable.

En réalité, la peinture est précédée par sa réputation. Celle, par exemple, que lui a faite le modernisme qui évacuait figure et narration, assimilait la forme au fond et mesurait le progrès en art au prorata de la spécification du médium. Au plan de la forme et de la procédure, les peintures de Closky nous renvoient, certes, à l’histoire de l’aplat et de la frontière abstraction-figuration (de Matisse au hard edge ou au néo géo en passant par le pop jusqu’à Olivier Mosset ou Sarah Morris, etc.) comme à celle du support (des disques de Delaunay aux cibles de Noland, sans oublier les tondos de Mosset et autres shaped canvases circulaires). Rien que de très naturel, et la manière dont le présent relie le passé n’annule pas la succession des faits. La singularité du tableau dans un monde où l’art s’est depuis longtemps annexé les objets du quotidien et où le quotidien s’est annexé les images, est une chose. Le silence absolu d’un tableau qui ferait oublier tout modèle, qu’il s’agisse des objets et du quotidien ou encore de l’art et de l’histoire, en est une autre, difficile à obtenir : à moins du prodigieux coup de dé qui nous délivrerait des modèles de la mémoire. Mais le hasard lui-même est indexé à l’histoire dont il lance les dés, et il est condamné à constituer lui-même un modèle : Representation (is) a fatality ! On n’en sort pas. La stricte autonomie de l’oeuvre s’accompagne des rires préenregistrés du spectacle de son autonomisation, elle n’ouvre pas vraiment sur la matérialité libérée de tout discours escomptée un temps par le formalisme. La série des 100 % Abstract d’Art & Language stigmatisait le fait que toute tentative en ce sens ne parvenait qu’à une tautologie, comme avec ce tableau de 1968 qui affiche le pourcentage des matières utilisées pour l’inscrire (Titanium calcium 83 % Silicates 17 %). La recette est la figure. La peinture reposant sur la forme n’émancipe pas la forme, elle la représente.

Art & Language, 100 % Abstract, 1968

Art & Language, ‘100 % Abstract’, 1968

silence tableau

Plus beau (2003-2005) est une installation vidéo interactive où chaque clic de la souris d’un ordinateur mis à disposition du public reconfigure un écran selon une disposition en damier. Les couleurs changent, l’échelle de la grille varie. L’agencement est sommaire et les possibilités apparemment infinies, le titre indique une progression dans la satisfaction. En effet chaque composition effaçant la précédente – replacing this relationship by a new one – et nous préparant à celle qui vient, la réputation de chaque image se fait de celles qui la précèdent et qui ont nourri notre attente. Mais si l’image est plus belle, c’est pour deux raisons contradictoires. Parce que nous avons vu les précédentes, et parce qu’elle nous les fait oublier. Plus beau table sur l’hésitation permanente entre l’enregistrement de ce qui vient et la trace de ce qui a été, l’instabilité du connu et du nouveau (qui n’est pas toujours l’inconnu) – et stigmatise une réincarnation constante et allégée du désir. Composition in progress, elle repose sur la nature énigmatique de notre disponibilité à l’instant présent.

Claude Closky, More Beautiful, 2002-2004

Claude Closky, More Beautiful, 2002-2004

Claude Closky, ‘More Beautiful’, 2002-2004,
installation vidéo interactive, 2 ordinateurs, 2 souris, 2 tables, 2 projecteurs vidéos, dimensions variables.

L’intitulé de la première exposition des tondos, Roue de la fortune, renvoyait à une forme triviale du coup de dé, cette surprise permanente du réel tant espérée dans l’art, mais le contenu passait par le « ralenti » de la peinture souligné par une gestuelle non spectaculaire et des compositions prévues d’avance. La formule suggérait également une coïncidence inattendue entre la neutralité géométrique de la surface picturale et les aléas de la chance. Rappelons que Roue de la fortune, qui évoque l’arbitraire des variations de l’économie et des finances, est le titre d’un jeu populaire et d’une émission culte de la télévision des années 1970. Soyons clairs, Closky n’avait rien réalisé au hasard, ni ces tableaux, ni ces caviardages de billets de loto devenus paradigmes de la grille abstraite moderniste. Il en avait très soigneusement programmé l’intervention dans les pièces de l’exposition de Genève, nous rappelant que la roue tourne : à 360°, à 100 %. Car si le hasard n’a pas de forme, il n’est pas non plus le chaos. Dans les jeux qui portent son nom, il est disposé par des règles strictes. En art, on parle des « lois du hasard », qui ont fourni des automates à des artistes désireux de se libérer de leurs propres automatismes, comme les époux Taeuber-Arp en 1917, plus tard John Cage, François Morellet ou Ellsworth Kelly. C’est Cage qui a conseillé à Kelly, alors en séjour en France et qu’il rencontre à Paris, de regarder les collages décidés par le hasard chez Arp à Meudon. Le jeune Américain cherchait un moyen pour échapper aux figures qui persistaient à surgir dans ses compositions abstraites. Encombré de sa fascination pour Picasso et Matisse, Kelly multipliait les stratégies pour produire un art « impersonnel » et mettre au monde des formes qui ne disent pas leur nom. Le hasard, sous l’espèce de l’aléatoire, sera l’une de ces stratégies, comme le châssis découpé qu’il développe au même moment que Frank Stella à New York. Le shaped canvas assorti au all-over a l’avantage d’évacuer la composante traditionnelle de la représentation, celle d’un fond désignant une figure sur la surface. Et pour échapper à cette omniprésence de la figure, François Morellet, que Kelly rencontre à la même époque, flirtait précocement avec l’art conceptuel et utilisait des systèmes préétablis pour régir ses compositions. Il le faisait bien avant sa série de 1961, Répartition aléatoire de 40 000 carrés, dont les titres précisent chaque fois le pourcentage de la répartition des deux couleurs utilisées au gré de la succession des pairs et impairs des numéros de l’annuaire téléphonique. Le hasard est un excellent outil pour travailler les codes, la répétition, la hiérarchie ou la loi, et pour perturber habitudes et lectures. Son atout, c’est qu’il ne véhicule aucun discours, c’est un opérateur de détachement, une fonction « main libre ». Les règlements et les contraintes, les codes et les hiérarchies qui peuplent notre existence font partie des matières premières de Closky qui s’amuse à en diluer l’intensité. Ici, la dispersion des facteurs de décision ajoute des embrayages dans une chaîne de production très vaste – vidéo, livres, impressions numériques, dessins… – où l’artiste perturbe l’ordre des connexions et substitue en effet « la relation exclusive qui lie un signe au sujet traité par une autre, tout aussi exclusive, avec lui-même ».

Le fait que l’apparence vienne en premier ne la limite pas aux seules apparences. Closky sait que sa manière de faire a un sens, que la technique qu’il choisit délivre un discours (que les formes se renvoient les unes aux autres plus sûrement qu’à ce qu’elles contiennent). Chez lui pas de virtuosité manuelle qui équivaudrait à une manifestation d’assurance, au double sens du terme ; pas d’effacement des procédures de fabrication qui donnerait à l’objet final un caractère d’évidence, une autorité ; pas de maladresses d’exécution qui mettraient l’accent sur l’auteur et sa signature. En revanche le détournement d’éléments existants a un pouvoir de désignation : de leur sphère d’origine, qui n’est pas l’art, et par extension de l’absence dont ils procèdent pour devenir de l’art. Le retard, le silence des figures déplacées renvoie à la frontière entre l’art et ce qui n’en est pas, mais aussi à l’écart entre la présence des choses et leur représentation, leur nom et l’anonymat de leur forme. Ce mutisme relatif n’évacue pas pour autant la mimésis des tableaux, où l’on finit toujours par voir quelque chose – car même si les formats et les signes qui nous entourent s’articulent plus avec eux-mêmes qu’à leur contenu, la représentation est une fatalité.

François Morellet, Répartition aléatoire de 40 000 carrés, 50 % noir, 50 % blanc, 1961

François Morellet, ‘Répartition aléatoire de 40 000 carrés, 50 % noir, 50 % blanc’, 1961

Closky revient à la peinture en l’articulant comme des mots, en fait un vocabulaire de surface, et joue donc avec quelques fausses platitudes sur la planéité et pas mal d’humour. La pratique picturale est devenue depuis un siècle une démarcation significative dans l’art, aux plans théorique et économique. Déclarée morte, elle se réincarne avec constance, et même si elle constitue aujourd’hui une forme artistique parmi d’autres, sa longévité en fait un indice majeur de la spéculation en art, au sens propre et au sens figuré. Closky procède avec elle comme lorsqu’il « nettoie » des photographies ou des vidéos, des textes ou des listes de mots qu’il s’approprie pour en faire les éléments d’un autre langage. Après tout, ce domaine financier où les deux séries prennent leur source permet peut-être également de les envisager comme des figures de tableaux au sens comptable du terme, où s’établirait un examen nécessairement superficiel et élémentaire de quelques usages de la peinture. À ceci près qu’aux questions de l’étendue spatiale, des modes de production, de la possibilité d’agir, ne sont offertes aucune abscisse ni ordonnée. À l’inverse des 100 % Abstract, exit la légende, le commentaire, et même les numéraires. Et à la différence des 40 000 carrés de Morellet, aucun système n’annonce la couleur. Pourtant, les tondos ne peuvent éviter le terrain de la connaissance et de l’histoire qu’ils affichent arbitrairement. À la déstabilisation des significations, habituelle chez cet artiste, la surface peinte ajoute une apparence de stabilité, matérielle et historique.

babélisation des signes

La pratique prolifique de Closky tend à considérer la circulation des signes comme une forme obsédante de la réalité. Il se déplace entre le pop, l’art conceptuel, et le versant plastique des expériences avec les mots, de Hains à Filliou, d’un peu de Fluxus à très peu d’Oulipo, en passant certainement par Morellet auquel il a rendu visite lorsqu’il a commencé ses premiers dessins et livres. En se préoccupant moins du contenu des signes d’usage ou de leur discours, que de l’usage des signes, Closky prolonge une ligne qui passe par Duchamp et surtout Broodthaers. Comme eux, il travaille avec tout ce qui nous fait croire ou non à ce que figurent les mots et les images, voir ou non la forme qu’ils prennent, ou la forme qu’ils donnent à ce qu’ils disent ou décrivent, etc. L’assertion du sens, ou d’un savoir sur une quelconque vérité, n’est pas son problème. Il babélise les langues, remet dans le circuit des formes rechargées de leur capacité d’ambivalence : le tondo est en réalité un shaped canvas qui a aussi la forme du tondo, ou encore celle d’une visée monoculaire, d’une cible, etc. Les tableaux sont à la fois des choses et des signes. Un signe ou une forme peuvent être invariables, la langue ou l’art leur offrent des entrées multiples. Leur transparence n’est qu’un leurre. La roue tourne.

Lire, ou regarder, ne nous donne pas toujours accès à des messages, mais nous convoque à de nouvelles possibilités d’articulation du visible, à d’infimes mouvements d’écart et de rapprochement des significations. L’art reconfigure et délie des systèmes et des langues, les replace dans le statut problématique du vivant. Et le mouvement des langues et des signes déplace ceux qui les parlent et les lisent.

En altérant des systèmes, Closky diffère la fatalité de la représentation et met le vif du sujet sur le tapis : une articulation entre l’autorité de la peinture, son format, les spéculations qui la font encore vivre, les diagrammes capables d’investir ce territoire, l’économie qui la distrait de ne parler que d’elle. Faites vos jeux : dans le partage des parts entre techniques, référents et les différents régimes auxquels ils appartiennent, transite le statut des signes et des choses qu’ils deviennent, mais pas seulement. Au final, quelque chose nous regarde dans le tableau. « Quant au livre intérieur de signes inconnus […] pour la lecture desquels personne ne pouvait m’aider d’aucune règle, cette lecture consistait en un acte de création où nul ne peut nous suppléer ni même collaborer avec nous [4] ».

[1] Ce texte est publié dans le cadre de l’exposition « Pictograms – The Loneliness of Signs », Kunstmuseum Stuttgart, 2006, p. 230.

[2] Les Ripoulins.

[3] La surface de réparation en football est la partie du terrain sur laquelle une faute peut entraîner un penalty, une réparation de la faute.

[4] Marcel Proust, « Le Temps retrouvé », À la recherche du temps perdu, t. III, Paris, Gallimard, Bibliothèque de la Pléiade, 1954, p. 879.