Lire la version originale en français

SMART OR DUMB?

Jill Gasparina
in Rectangulaire, Les presses du réel, Dijon, 2015. Translated from French by Tiffany Thomas

“Soon, everyone on earth will be connected”

Claude Closky is not a net.artist, he is a conceptual artist and even a “ludo-conceptual” [1] one, in the words of art historian Michel Gauthier in his essay dedicated to the artist’s work (2008). His work has often been described as a critique of the media landscape. The media is not limited to printed newspapers and magazines, but largely overflows—at least since the invention of the electric telegraph, the Victorian Internet [2]—in the partially immaterial world shaped by information technology. It was thus logical that Claude Closky would gradually annex the medium that is the Internet. Since 1997, and with the help of computer scientist and programmer Jean-Noël Lafargue, he has developed nearly a hundred websites, all listed on the same website: sittes.net.

In his essay, Michel Gauthier described Collage (an artwork created in 1990, consisting of a piece of duck tape stuck to a sheet of paper, at the bottom of which is written “collage”) as the most eloquent example of Closky’s “hyper-literalism,” [3] a radical version of the artist’s common literalism. In this respect, in 2003, the website Search embodied the digital facet of this literalness: the only result it offered to a particular web search query was a number corresponding to the amount of occurrences of this very query (when this essay was being written, the name “Claude” had been the object of 301 search queries, whereas the first name “Jill” the object of only 3—all the searches being performed by the author). There is thus a kind of continuity in the nature of the work he delivers in his material works, in multiples of all kinds, in his exhibitions, and in what he does online. The same literalism, and the same forms of humor, the same “documentary rawness” and the same “cheap sublime,” [4] the same post-consumerist poetry, [5] the same articulation between the simplicity of the artistic gesture and the complexity of the experience it offers, and the same discreet way of highlighting existential questions and life projects based on next to nothing.

Claude Closky, Collage, 1990
Claude Closky, ‘Collage’, 1990,
brown tape and ballpoint pen on paper, 30 x 24 cm

From this perspective, his first two websites have a programmatic dimension. In 1996, as a response to a commission by the DIA Foundation, Closky selected hundreds of excerpts drawn from a vast magazine collection belonging to Olivier Zahm. He turned them into two questionnaires and created two large sets of tests that mimicked the ones found in women’s magazines. The first page featured a crucial choice between love or lust: Do you want love or lust? Two parallel paths then unraveled throughout hundreds of pages of questions about work, love, friendship, family, sexuality, food—like an immense trend book of all the possible moods. It seemed like an endless succession that one could hardly manage to deplete. The colors of the pages varied without any real link to the theme of the questions. The process of these random combinations (a principle that the artist is particularly fond of) was simple: the colors, just like the textual content, were purely decorative. This contraction of the existential and the anecdotal, this scathing critique of the binary, obeys strategies that were already well established in the artist’s work.

Calendrier 1997 [Calendar 1997] plays in an identical range: following the principle of the ephemeris, the website is updated daily, offering for each new date a quote from the advertising prose, thereby delivered to the viewer like food for thought. Breaking the hierarchy between advertising speech and artistic speech, this calendar gives advertising an oracular value. This work does not only teach us that one can ponder over the anonymous prose of the Bon Marché, the SNCF, Honda, Miele and Volkswagen, as one would with a quote from the Dalai Lama, Montaigne, or Jacques Attali, drawn from a quotation dictionary. The very act of isolating a short extract from a text also serves as a reflection on the exhibition as such, or even teaches us another lesson: if one can spend a long time meditating over an advertising slogan, provided that one exhibits it, then any material whatsoever can enter the exhibition space.

Beyond the undeniable similarities between on- and off-line work, the critique that seeps through these websites has a specific dimension—one that focuses on the Internet’s technological and cultural imaginary world, [6] and of course on its uses. By the late 2000s, some of these “non-websites,” as the artist calls them, functioned as jokes on the notion of interactivity, in which was bogged down enthusiastic talk on information technology.

In 2000, +1 offered a zero degree of interactivity as a response to this situation. When one clicked, a sum was carried out. That’s was it. More vs. Less, Plus Vite [faster] and More Beautiful were all parodies of the same ideology of communicative efficiency, which information technology discourse has heavily drawn from (and continues to do so). In More Beautiful for example, each refreshed page randomly gave out a new composition and a new set of colors. Each page was supposedly more beautiful than the last. With this disarmingly simple system, Closky proposed nothing less than to question the criteria of Beauty. And the pursuit of Beauty is endless. Is it complexity that is beautiful? Is it simplicity? Color harmony? This demonstrates the very stupidity of trying to quantify and classify Beauty.

Claude Closky, +1, 2000
Claude Closky, ‘+1’, 2000,
projector, computer, table, mouse, permanent Internet connexion (http://www.sittes.net/indice), dimensions variable, unlimited duration

“Identity will be the most valuable commodity for citizens in the future, and it will exist primarily online”

When looking at this body of websites, one can observe that Closky has incorporated the web’s evolutions into his creations, and particularly the gradual shift towards a more user-friendly web, adapted to users without programming skills (what we call Web 2.0, which is not based on a different technological device than that of the first web, but which generalizes “architectures of participation,” [7] a network effect and the production of content by the users themselves).

However Closky uses the major interfaces for posting personal content like assisted ready-mades: if he makes a blog, a Tumblr or more seldom, artworks for Facebook or Twitter, he slips into an already well designed platform and very often alters its code, slightly transforming the ready-to-use templates. These actions, although discrete, have a strong critical potential. Faced with the exploitation of a global digital proletariat, more and more voices rise up for the establishment of a commodification system for personal content. More than willing to graciously share the content and the data that he generates, Closky offers an essential contribution to the debate, recalling that the solution is to make one’s own HTML pages rather than sell one’s data, that communicating with friends is possible without a Facebook page, and that a FOC economy can be devised other than as a form of exploitation. The subtle programming effects of his websites, which only appear if we agree to devote some of our time to them, and maybe even play with them, must also be taken into account to understand his strategy: they aim to give a more specific attention to this medium, to take it seriously, in short.

Source Html (2011) could have perhaps been the manifesto of this outlook on the possible uses of the Internet. The page offers visitors to look at the source code. After having done so (at least for those who know how to access this code), an image appears. There is nothing natural about the source: it is a hand holding a watering hose. In a Duchampian act of humor, the lyrical motif is cast back to a trivial form. From the source to the fall, a double literal poetic play took place, asserting that there is a form of poetry very particular to coding, but also that the code itself may be the Source, or in other words the solution.

Claude Closky, Source html, 2011
Claude Closky, ‘Source html’, 2011,
web site (http://sittes.net/source.html)

Also regarding World Wide Web evolution, Closky’s recent reflections have been focusing mainly on issues of identity production and exposure. As stated by Boris Groys, social networks have created an “obligation to self-design.” [8] He points out that we must now all design and devise the digital interface that we send out to the world. As a response to this situation, certain websites have chosen a generic identity, rejecting the faces woven with advertising trivialities or aesthetic mass fads. Kept active for one year, Welcome to My Blog (2006) consisted for example of a short daily post, in which the author recounted his day whilst maintaining a strict separation between his professional and his personal life, between his work environment and his domestic life. Each day was also summed up in one word, a particular mood (as always, the content as a whole was made up of found material). With its pompous title, it acquired a generic quality that shed light on the different uses of blogging, the commercial relationship to intimacy, and the impossible yearning for originality.

More recently The 24th of May [9] offered to follow the circulation of an image on Tumblr for one whole day, as far as it was technically possible. The chosen image was a skull with roses on a black background; an image with strong immaterial tackiness, pure Tumblr romanticism, perfectly designed to please everyone and circulate endlessly in order to become a component of the atlas that each user designs for others to see. Every time, appropriation strategies clash with the construction of an original identity.

Claude Closky, The 24th of May 2013, 2013
Claude Closky, ‘The 24th of May 2013’, 2013,
(tumblr) web site (http://24-05-2013.tumblr.com)

“We are what we tweet”

In this context, how is Rectangulaire [Rectangular] to be understood? The project’s primary goal is to enable a limited group (the PASTE association) to feel as one. It can also be described in broader terms as a reflection regarding the representation of individuals or groups (the website is accessible to all), addressed to the whole community. If a comparison is still possible between the individualized interface of a social network and the miniaturized space of a business card, it will tone down the archaic dimension of a rectangle bearing a name and a randomized composition with regards to a Facebook page. As Closky explains, the Internet is a simple circulation tool in Rectangular and not an idea to dwell upon.

Whilst it is true that a number of other websites raise similar questions on identity creation and representation—whether it be an individual or a collective identity—it seems more relevant to compare Rectangular with other works playing with forms of name/first name. For example, My People and Biennales are two books of sonnets made up of celebrity names from the TV and cinema industry for the former, and from the art world for the latter. Classement, another recently published [10] textual work, consists of 8 pages that blend names and first names without ever giving a chance to decipher the logic behind their classification. Let us return to the variation games that the artist performs on his own name, in the sittes.net bookmark. In a looped format, the bookmark is refreshed nearly every ten seconds and displays a new approximate version of the artist’s name: Claudo Quoski, Quaude Kloky, Clude Clossy, Cladde Klooky, Clod Closkie, Claue Chosky, Clauce Closko, Kaude Closhy, Chaude Koski, Code Cosky, Cloud Clowsky, Clode Cloky, Caude Closky, Cleaude Clocky, Klaude Klosky, Claud Losky, Clade Klosky, Klaude Cosky, Laude Clausky, Colode Coloski, Claud Cloqui, Caude Cloky. First and foremost, these variations and accumulations prove that names have a genuine comical faculty. In fact, this dimension is also very clear in Rectangular’s preparatory study, in which the artist manipulated gallery listings. In order to test his various randomized composition projects, he invented names that do not exist but that are akin to the most famous names of the art world.

Claude Closky, My people (followed by biennials), 2008-2009
Claude Closky, ‘My people (followed by biennials)’, 2009-2008,
Marseilles: Al Dante Publishing (English and French separate editions). Two color offset, 96 pages, 21 x 14,5 cm

Nevertheless, the final version of Rectangular has the distinction of being one of the only works by the artist to be devoid of a humorous dimension. And indeed, according to the “hyper-realism” strategy that Michel Gauthier described as central to the artist œuvre, the use of this name/first name form can only lead to a rather bleak vision of individual identity—the inevitably ephemeral, and never truly original, association of a name and first name with a given randomized composition that each of us is forced to identify with. As a comparison, the 1,200 frames of the installation Each and Every One of You (2004) by Allan McCollum, which each contained a single first name, male or female (the 600 most popular male and female first names in the US in 2003), may bring about a more emotionally chaotic interpretation, but also a more joyful one, forged with personal and cultural memories—at least for a North American visitor for whom these names are actually common.

Allan McCollum, ‘Each and Every One of You,’ 2004, 1,200 digital print on cotton, each 10 x 15. Exhibition view La Salle de bains, Lyon, 2011
Allan McCollum, ‘Each and Every One of You,’ 2004,
1,200 digital print on cotton, each 10 x 15. Exhibition view La Salle de bains, Lyon, 2011

As for the list of names of the collective body—which would be its purest conceptual form—it will never materialize. The website Rectangular has no archives: it will not keep a record of these names; it will not store any data. Rectangular always deletes the names from the interface and disseminates them. This conceptual body is a scattered body.

If there is well and truly a continuity between the nature of Claude Closky’s online works and that of his physical works, it is maybe because all of his works, with their taxonomic games, classifications, data and list accumulations, highlight a phenomenon that is coextensive with modernity as a whole and not just its digital version: the empowerment of statistical laws and their consequences, “the imperialism of probabilities,” “the enthusiasm for numerical data,” the “avalanche of printed numbers” and the invention of “normal people,” brilliantly described by Ian Hacking in The Taming of Chance [11]—his political, administrative, scientific history of the West since the Age of Enlightenment. Refusing to archive and to classify in Rectangular is not only a way of making these laws apparent but also a means of evading them.

All of the quotes in the subtitles are from Eric Schmidt and Jared Cohen, The New Digital Age. Reshaping the Future of People, Nations and Business, Alfred A. Knopf, New York, 2013.

[1] Michel Gauthier, 8002-9891, catalog of Claude Closky’s retrospective at MAC/VAL (from March 28 to June 22, 2008), Éd. du MAC/VAL, 2008, p. 111.

[2] Tom Standage, The Victorian Internet. The Remarkable History of the Telegraph and the Nineteenth Century’s On-line Pioneers, New York, Walker and Company, 1998.

[3] Michel Gauthier, op.cit., p. 111.

[4] Frédéric Paul, Hello and Welcome, Éd. Domaine de Kerguéhennec – Le Parvis, 2004, p. 8.

[5] Kenneth Goldsmith has called Claude Closky a “Post-consumerist Poet” when speaking of Mon Catalogue.

[6] See Patrice Flichy, The Internet Imaginaire, Cambridge MA, The MIT Press, 2007.

[7] See Tim O’Reilly, What Is Web 2.0, 09/30/2005.

[8] Boris Groys, “The Obligation to Self-Design,” in Going Public, Journal / e-flux, New York-Berlin, Sternberg Press, 2011, p. 21 and sqq.

[9] See also for example Reblogging, 2012.

[10] BLANCHE n0 2, Éditions Autrechose, February 2015.

[11] Ian Hacking, The Taming of Chance, “The argument,” Cambrige University Press, 1990, p. 2.

 

 

Read the English translation

SMART OR DUMB?

Jill Gasparina
in Rectangulaire, Les presses du réel, Dijon, 2015.

« Soon, everyone on earth will be connected. »

Claude Closky n’est pas un net artiste, c’est un artiste conceptuel et même « ludo-conceptuel [1] », pour reprendre l’expression de l’historien d’art Michel Gauthier dans l’essai qu’il lui a consacré en 2008.

Son travail a été fréquemment décrit comme une critique du paysage médiatique. Les médias ne se limitant pas aux journaux papier et aux magazines, mais débordant largement – au moins depuis l’invention de cet Internet victorien [2] que fut le télégraphe électrique – dans le monde partiellement immatériel dessiné par les technologies de l’information, il était donc logique que Claude Closky annexe progressivement ce médium qu’est Internet. Il a ainsi développé depuis 1997, et avec l’aide de l’informaticien et programmeur Jean-Noël Lafargue, près d’une centaine de sites Internet, tous répertoriés sur un même site, sittes.net.

Dans son essai, Michel Gauthier fait de Collage (œuvre réalisée en 1990, consistant en un morceau de ruban adhésif d’emballage collé sur une feuille de papier, au bas de laquelle il est écrit « collage »), l’exemple le plus éloquent de l’« hyperlittéralisme [3] » de Closky, une version radicale du littéralisme à laquelle l’artiste a souvent recours. À cet égard, le site Search, en 2003, incarne parfaitement le versant numérique de cette littéralité : il propose, comme seule réponse aux requêtes effectuées, un nombre, correspondant aux occurrences de cette même requête (au moment de l’écriture de cet essai, le prénom « Claude » avait fait l’objet de 301 recherches et le prénom « Jill » de 3 recherches seulement, toutes réalisées par l’auteur). Il existe ainsi une continuité de nature entre le travail qu’il livre dans ses œuvres matérielles, multiples en tout genre, et expositions, et ce qu’il fait en ligne. On y trouve le même littéralisme, donc, et les mêmes formes d’humour, la même « crudité documentaire » et le même « sublime de pacotille [4] », la même poésie post-consumériste [5], la même articulation entre la simplicité des gestes artistiques et la complexité de l’expérience qu’ils offrent, et la même manière discrète de pointer vers des questions existentielles et des projets de vie à partir de presque rien.

Claude Closky, Collage, 1990
Claude Closky, ‘Collage’, 1990,
brown tape and ballpoint pen on paper, 30 x 24 cm

Ses deux premiers sites ont, de ce point de vue, une dimension programmatique. En 1996, pour répondre à une commande de la DIA Foundation, Closky sélectionne des centaines d’extraits de textes puisés dans un vaste fonds de magazines appartenant à Olivier Zahm. Il les transpose sous la forme de deux questionnaires et crée deux vastes ensembles qui miment les pages de tests dans la presse féminine. La première page propose un choix crucial entre l’amour ou la luxure : Do you want love or lust? Se déroulent alors deux cheminements parallèles à travers des centaines de pages de questions sur la vie professionnelle, l’amour, l’amitié, la famille, la sexualité, l’alimentation, comme un vaste carnet de tendance des humeurs possibles. C’est une succession apparemment infinie, qu’on parviendrait difficilement à épuiser. Les couleurs des pages varient, sans lien réel avec la thématique des questions posées. Cette association arbitraire (un principe que l’artiste affectionne par ailleurs énormément) est simple : la couleur, comme le contenu textuel, sont du pur décor. Ce télescopage de l’existentiel et de l’anecdotique, cette critique acerbe de la binarité obéit à des stratégies déjà bien rodées dans le travail de l’artiste.

Calendrier 1997 joue sur un registre identique. Sur le principe de l’éphéméride, le site se réactualise quotidiennement, proposant, à la date du jour, une citation trouvée dans la prose publicitaire, ainsi livrée à la méditation du regardeur. Cassant la hiérarchie entre discours publicitaire et discours d’auteur, ce calendrier donne à la publicité une valeur oraculaire. Que l’on puisse trouver à méditer à partir de la prose anonyme du Bon Marché, de la SNCF, Honda, Miele ou Volkswagen, comme on le ferait avec une citation du Dalaï-Lama, de Montaigne ou de Jacques Attali puisée dans un dictionnaire de citations, n’est pas le moindre des enseignements de cette œuvre. Le geste consistant à isoler ainsi un court extrait de texte fonctionne aussi comme une réflexion sur l’exposition, voire une leçon : si l’on peut passer un long moment à méditer un slogan publicitaire, pour peu qu’on l’expose, alors n’importe quel matériau peut franchir la porte d’un espace d’exposition.

Par delà les indéniables similarités entre le travail online et offline, la critique qui traverse ces sites possède une dimension spécifique, portant sur l’imaginaire technologique et culturel d’Internet [6], et bien entendu sur ses usages. Dès la fin des années 2000, certains de ses « non sites », comme les nomme l’artiste, fonctionnent comme des blagues sur la notion d’interactivité, dans laquelle le discours enthousiaste sur les technologies de l’information se trouve alors englué.

+1, en 2000, propose par exemple, en guise de réponse à cette situation le degré zéro de l’interactivité. On clique, une addition s’opère. C’est tout. More vs Less [Plus versus moins], Plus vite et More Beautiful [Plus beau] parodient de même l’idéologie de l’efficacité communicationnelle, dans laquelle le discours des technologies de l’information a largement puisé (et continue de le faire). Dans More Beautiful, par exemple, chaque rafraîchissement de page propose de manière aléatoire une nouvelle composition et un nouveau jeu de couleurs. Chaque page est supposée être plus belle que la précédente. Avec ce système d’une simplicité désarmante, Closky propose rien de moins que d’interroger les critères du Beau. Et la quête du Beau est sans fin. Est-ce la complexité qui est belle ? La simplicité ? L’harmonie des couleurs ? Voilà qui démontre l’idiotie même contenue dans le projet de quantifier et de classifier le Beau.

Claude Closky, +1, 2000
Claude Closky, ‘+1’, 2000,
projector, computer, table, mouse, permanent Internet connexion (http://www.sittes.net/indice), dimensions variable, unlimited duration

« Identity will be the most valuable commodity for citizens in the future, and it will exist primarily online. »

L’examen de l’ensemble du corpus constitué par ces sites montrent que Closky a intégré à ses créations les évolutions du web, et notamment le glissement progressif vers un web plus simple d’utilisation pour des usagers sans compétence de programmation (ce qu’on appelle le web 2.0, qui ne repose pas sur un dispositif technologique différent du premier web, mais généralise des  « architectures de participation [7] », les effets de réseau et la production de contenus par les usagers eux-mêmes).

Closky utilise cependant les grandes interfaces de mise en ligne de contenus personnels comme des ready-mades aidés : s’il réalise des blogs, des Tumblr ou beaucoup plus rarement des œuvres pour Facebook ou Twitter, se glissant ainsi dans une plate-forme déjà dessinée, il en modifie très souvent le code, transformant légèrement les gabarits prêts à l’usage. Ces gestes, bien que discrets, possèdent un fort coefficient critique. Alors que face à l’exploitation d’un prolétariat numérique global, trop content de céder gracieusement les contenus et les données qu’il génère, de plus en plus de voix s’élèvent pour que soit mis en place un système de marchandisation de ces contenus personnels, Closky propose au débat une contribution essentielle, en rappelant que la solution consiste à faire ses propres pages HTML plus qu’à vendre ses données, que l’on peut communiquer avec ses amis sans passer par une page Facebook, et qu’une économie de la gratuité peut s’élaborer autrement que dans une forme d’exploitation. Les subtils effets de programmation de ses sites, qui n’apparaissent que si l’on accepte de leur consacrer du temps, voire de jouer avec, sont aussi à prendre en compte dans la compréhension de sa stratégie : ils visent à créer une attention plus précise à ce médium, à le prendre au sérieux, en somme.

Source Html (2011) serait peut-être le manifeste de cette vision des usages possibles de l’Internet. La page propose au visiteur d’aller voir le code source. Ceci étant fait (du moins pour ceux qui savent comment accéder à ce code), apparaît une image. Nulle source naturelle ici : c’est une main qui tient un tuyau d’arrosage. Dans un geste à l’humour duchampien, le motif lyrique est renvoyé à une forme triviale. De la source à la chute s’accomplit ici un double jeu poétique littéral, qui affirme qu’il existe une forme de poésie très spécifique au codage, mais aussi que le code est peut-être la Source, c’est-à-dire la solution.

Claude Closky, Source html, 2011
Claude Closky, ‘Source html’, 2011,
web site (http://sittes.net/source.html)

Toujours en lien avec les évolutions du web, les réflexions récentes de Closky s’orientent très largement vers les questions de production et d’exposition des identités. Les réseaux sociaux, comme l’écrit Boris Groys, ont créé une « obligation de self-design [8] ». Nous devons désormais tous dessiner et penser l’interface numérique que nous adressons au reste du monde, explique-t-il. Comme une réponse à cette situation, certains sites donnent à voir des identités génériques sans visage tissées de banalités publicitaires ou des engouements esthétiques de masse. Alimenté pendant un an, Welcome to My Blog (2006), est, par exemple, constitué d’un post quotidien succinct, dans lequel l’auteur raconte sa journée en maintenant une séparation rigide entre vie professionnelle et personnelle, entre l’univers du travail et la vie domestique. Chaque journée est par ailleurs résumée en un mot, une humeur (l’ensemble étant, comme toujours, construit avec des matériaux trouvés). Avec son titre ronflant, il possède une qualité générique qui vient mettre en lumière les usages du blogging, le rapport publicitaire à l’intimité et l’impossible aspiration à l’originalité.

Plus récemment The 24th of May [9] propose de suivre pendant une journée, dans les limites du possible, bien entendu, la circulation d’une image sur Tumblr. L’image choisie représente un crâne avec des roses sur fond noir, c’est une image d’un kitsch immatériel intense, du romantisme Tumblr pur jus, parfaitement designée pour plaire à tous, circuler sans fin et intégrer comme une composante de l’atlas que chaque usager dessine à destination des autres. À chaque fois, les stratégies d’appropriation se télescopent avec la construction d’une identité originale.

Claude Closky, The 24th of May 2013, 2013
Claude Closky, ‘The 24th of May 2013’, 2013,
(tumblr) web site (http://24-05-2013.tumblr.com)

« We are what we tweet. »

Comment comprendre Rectangulaire dans ce contexte ? Le projet consiste en premier lieu à permettre à un groupe limité (l’association PASTE) de faire corps. Il est également pensé plus largement comme une réflexion, adressée à la collectivité toute entière, sur la représentation des individus ou des groupes (le site est accessible à tous). Si la comparaison entre l’interface individualisée d’un réseau social et l’espace miniaturisé d’une carte de visite est toujours possible, elle ne peut que gommer la dimension très archaïque d’un rectangle porteur d’un nom et d’une composition aléatoire en regard d’une page Facebook. Dans Rectangulaire, comme l’explique Closky, l’Internet est un simple outil de diffusion, pas un véritable sujet de réflexion.

S’il partage avec certains sites un même questionnement sur la constitution et la représentation d’une identité qu’elle soit individuelle ou collective, c’est plutôt de certaines œuvres jouant avec la forme du nom/prénom que l’on pourrait rapprocher Rectangulaire. On pensera ici à Les Miens et Biennales, deux recueils de sonnets constitués seulement de listes de noms de célébrités de l’audiovisuel pour le premier, du monde de l’art pour le second, ou Classement, autre œuvre textuelle récemment publiée [10], qui consiste en une liste de 8 pages où se mêlent noms et prénoms, sans qu’il ne soit jamais possible de percer la logique de leur classement. Évoquons encore le jeu de variations que l’artiste accomplit sur son propre nom, dans le signet de sittes.net. Toutes les dix secondes environ, le signet se rafraîchit pour afficher des versions approximatives du nom de l’artiste, qui tournent en boucle : Claudo Quoski, Quaude Kloky, Clude Clossy, Cladde Klooky, Clod Closkie, Claue Chosky, Clauce Closko, Kaude Closhy, Chaude Koski, Code Cosky, Cloud Clowsky, Clode Cloky, Caude Closky, Cleaude Clocky, Klaude Klosky, Claud Losky, Clade Klosky, Klaude Cosky, Laude Clausky, Colode Coloski, Claud Cloqui, Caude Cloky. Ce qui se dit dans ces variations et ces accumulations, c’est d’abord que le nom possède un authentique pouvoir comique. Cette dimension apparaît d’ailleurs très nettement dans l’étude préparatoire de Rectangulaire, dans laquelle l’artiste a manipulé des listings de galerie, inventant, pour tester ses différents projets de composition aléatoire, des noms qui n’existent pas, mais qui possèdent un air de famille avec des noms plus célèbres du milieu artistique.

Claude Closky, My people (followed by biennials), 2008-2009
Claude Closky, ‘My people (followed by biennials)’, 2009-2008,
Marseilles: Al Dante Publishing (English and French separate editions). Two color offset, 96 pages, 21 x 14,5 cm

Pour autant, la version finale de Rectangulaire a la particularité d’être l’une des rares œuvres de l’artiste dont la dimension humoristique est quasi absente. Et c’est peut-être parce que l’emploi de cette forme nom/prénom ne peut générer, conformément à la stratégie de l’ « hyperréalisme » que Michel Gauthier a identifiée comme centrale chez l’artiste, qu’une vision assez lugubre de l’identité individuelle : l’association, forcément temporaire, et jamais vraiment originale, d’un prénom et d’un nom de famille, une composition trouvée et largement aléatoire que chacun est contraint de s’approprier. À titre de comparaison, les 1 200 cadres de l’installation Each and Every One of You (2004) d’Allan McCollum, qui comprennent chacun un simple prénom qu’il soit masculin ou féminin (les 600 prénoms masculins et féminins les plus populaires aux USA en 2003), génèrent, du moins pour un spectateur nord-américain pour qui ces prénoms sont courants, une lecture peut-être plus chaotique émotionnellement, mais aussi plus joyeuse, et tissée de souvenirs personnels ou culturels.

Allan McCollum, ‘Each and Every One of You,’ 2004, 1,200 digital print on cotton, each 10 x 15. Exhibition view La Salle de bains, Lyon, 2011
Allan McCollum, ‘Each and Every One of You,’ 2004,
1,200 impressions numériques sur coton, 10 x 15 chaque. Vue d’exposition La Salle de bains, Lyon, 2011

Quant au corps collectif, dont la liste de noms serait la version conceptuelle la plus pure, il ne se matérialisera jamais. Le site de Rectangulaire n’archive rien de ceux qui en font usage. Aucune trace ne sera conservée de ces noms, aucune donnée ne sera stockée. Rectangulaire fait disparaître les noms de l’interface et il les dissémine. Ce corps conceptuel est un corps dispersé.

S’il existe bel et bien une continuité de nature entre les œuvres en ligne et les œuvres physiques que Claude Closky a produites, c’est peut-être parce que l’ensemble de son travail, avec ses jeux taxinomiques, ses classements, ses accumulations de données et de listes, met en évidence un phénomène coextensif à la modernité toute entière et pas seulement à sa version numérique : l’autonomisation des lois statistiques et ses corollaires, « l’impérialisme des probabilités », « l’enthousiasme pour les données numériques », « l’avalanche de nombres imprimés » et l’invention de l’« homme normal », brillamment décrits par Ian Hacking dans The Taming of Chance [11], son histoire politique, administrative et scientifique de l’Occident depuis les Lumières. Dans Rectangulaire, le refus de l’archive, du classement est aussi une manière de se soustraire à ces lois, et pas seulement de les donner à voir.

Toutes les citations des intertitres sont issues de Eric Schmidt et Jared Cohen, The New Digital Age. Reshaping the Future of People, Nations and Business, Alfred A. Knopf, New York, 2013.

[1] Michel Gauthier, 8002-9891, catalogue de la rétrospective de Claude Closky au MAC/VAL (du 28 mars au 22 juin 2008), Éd. du MAC/VAL, 2008, p. 111.

[2] Tom Standage, The Victorian Internet. The Remarkable History of the Telegraph and the Nineteenth Century’s On-line Pioneers, New York, Walker and Company, 1998.

[3] Michel Gauthier, op. cit., p. 111.

[4] Frédéric Paul, Hello and Welcome, Éd. Domaine de Kerguéhennec – Le Parvis, 2004, p. 8.

[5] Kenneth Goldsmith a qualifié Claude Closky de « poète post-consumériste », à propos de Mon Catalogue.

[6] Voir Patrice Flichy, The Internet Imaginaire, Cambridge MA, The MIT Press, 2007.

[7] Voir Tim O’Reilly, What Is Web 2.0, 09/30/2005.

[8] Boris Groys, « The Obligation to Self-Design », dans Going Public, Journal / e-flux, New York-Berlin, Sternberg Press, 2011, p. 21 et sqq.

[9] Voir aussi par exemple Reblogging, 2012.

[10] BLANCHE n° 2, Éditions Autrechose, février 2015.

[11] Ian Hacking, The Taming of Chance, « The argument », Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 1990, p. 2.